REDUCED OXYGEN GAS ENDED THE LIVERS ABILITY TO KILL AND FILTER HEPATITUS C.

OXYGEN CRISIS

By Christopher A. Brown 9/25/02

HOW MIGHT LOW OXYGEN LEVELS IMPACT HUMAN LIFE?

The following is my theory that explains the sudden imapct of a disease present in peoples systems for years that is suddenly trigggered into virulent takeover of the persons body. Below is some information on hepC and the liver. In a short search I couldn't find any thing that specifically rules out the validity of this theory.

Prior to 1995, more or less, hepatitis C did not have a name. It was called, non A, non B. Somewhere near 1995 an unusually high number of people, mostly in California, had suddenly become ill, gone to physicians and were then diagnosed with hepatitis. There was so much of it that it was given its own letter, C. Most of those diagnosed, it turns out, had contracted it many years before. Why did all of a sudden, did this dormant virus become active and destroy peoples health?

A simple course of logic can supply an explanation that relates decreased oxygen levels to the sudden, delayed epidemic of hepatitis C.

Oxygen kills virus in the blood. When people who had the dormant hepatitis virus in their system began drinking water with decreased oxygen levels the virus started to take over. All water consumed goes through the liver. The liver traps the total disolved oxygen in the its tissues that are involved with filtering the blood supply. When the oxygen levels fell in the water consumed by those carrying the virus, the virus in their blood that had been killed and turned into a waste product, suddenly multiplied and took over their bodies.

HERE IS THE LANGUAGE WITHIN NAFTA THAT MAKES IT SO CALIFORNIA CANNOT BAN MTBE.

"Corporations emphasize that "MTBE has been studied extensively and there is no evidence that it has any adverse impact on human health at reasonably expected exposure levels."

"MTBE is not a human carcinogen. Last year the International Agency for Research on Cancer (IARC) determined that MTBE is "not classifiable" as a human carcinogen.No Party [i.e., a party to the agreement Canada, the U.S., or Mexico] shall directly or indirectly nationalize or expropriate an investment of an investor of another party in its territory

Hepatitis C virons
hepatitus_c_virus
NAFTA(Chapter 11)

No Party [i.e., a party to the agreement Canada, the U.S., or Mexico] shall directly or indirectly nationalize or expropriate an investment of an investor of another party in its territory.

The following text is from:

http://www.epidemic.org/theFacts/hepatitisC/hepatitisC.html The Hepatitis C Virus

Although its means of transmission is fairly well documented, the hepatitis C virus itself largely remains a mystery. Hepatitis C is extremely small, even for a virus - it is only about 50 nanometers in diameter. A nanometer is one billionth of a meter - if you placed 200,000 hepatitis C viruses end to end, they would be only a single centimeter long. (They are so small that they have no color - they are in fact smaller than the wavelength of visible light.) However, what is known about hepatitis C underscores the type of threat that it poses.

Hepatitis C is an RNA virus - which means that it mutates frequently. Once an infection has begun, hepatitis C creates different genetic variations of itself within the body of the host. The mutated forms are frequently different enough from their ancestors that the immune system cannot recognize them. Thus, even if the immune system begins to succeed against one variation, the mutant strains quickly take over and become new, predominant strains. As a result, the development of antibodies against HCV does not produce an immunity against the disease like it does with most other viruses. More than 80% of the individuals infected with HCV will progress to a chronic form of the disease.

As a result of this, hepatitis C is usually not self-limited as a disease. In more than 85% of all cases, whether they progress to chronic liver disease or not, the infected individual carries the virus for life. This means that they also remain contagious for a lifetime, able to transmit the virusto others. And because of the long progression of the illness, even patients who will eventually die as a result of hepatitis C carry the virus for decades before it takes their lives. Most epidemics are self-limiting - they spread rapidly, but over a short period of time the affected population either dies or develops an immunity to the disease, and it stops spreading. Not so with hepatitis C. Much like HIV and AIDS, it lasts a lifetime, and kills slowly - giving the virus plenty of time to spread.

liver tumor

liver_tumor

iron_liver

Micrograph of liver loaded with iron.

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